Pokemon Go: Poke-Marketing?

pokemon-1521104_640

Do you want to be the very best, like no one ever was? If so, then you’re probably one of the 7.5 million people who have downloaded the Pokemon Go app since its recent launch.

The app, a location-based augmented reality game that enables you to catch virtual Pokemon in the real world, has experienced a tremendous start since its release in the United States. Pokemon Go has captivated mobile users of all ages worldwide, quickly becoming a cultural phenomenon.

Within weeks, the game generated an estimated $1.6 million in revenue per day. Benefiting from this instant success is Nintendo, parent to Pokemon Co., which has already seen a 25 percent increase in stock shares and added nearly $11 billion to its market value.

The popularity of Pokemon Go and its clear potential for profit not only have opened the door for Nintendo’s success, but also have become a tool for Pokemon-inspired marketing by food and retail businesses.

The game format encourages users to explore their real-world cities to find in-game Pokemon , PokeStops or Gyms, which can be found at actual landmarks and local businesses. This alone is a valuable marketing tool that can result in rising visits and an increase in foot traffic for any organization hoping to convert locals who want to play into customers willing to pay.

Real-world marketing value

Some establishments have already realized the marketing potential of the virtual Pokemon in the real world. By flaunting ties with the game, Main Street businesses have been able to set themselves up for an increase in recognition, popularity or profit.

Storefronts have found a number of ways to engage with the traveling hordes of Pokemon trainers. One of the most popular methods of capitalizing on the app’s hype is to place Lure Modules at Poketops at or near a business’ location.

A Lure Module is a well-recognized in-game feature that enables users to attract Pokemon to a certain area. Although the Lure Modules were designed to bring in Pokemon, they’re also bringing in a slew of gamers.


‘Poke-marketing’

Pokemon Go has become a great way for retail business to attract potential customers to its location. Once gamers are lured in, stores have taken “Poke-marketing” a step further by offering tailored discounts and promotions.

These strategies are just the start of what is sure to become a more prevalent marketing approach as the app rolls out in more countries, evolves and inspires copycats. Bringing an entire generation’s childhood nostalgia into the modern age of augmented reality gaming is unlike anything we’ve ever seen before.

Although this level of popularity can be fleeting, Pokemon has retained its status as a recognizable and well-loved brand since 1996. With the game’s technological sophistication and promise of added, advanced features—in-game chat functions, head-to-head battles, Pokemon trading, and so on—there doesn’t seem to be an end to Pokemon Go’s success anytime soon.

Kelly Holcombe is an account coordinator at Flackable, a national financial public relations and digital marketing agency. Connect with her on Twitter: @kelly_holcombe . This article was reposted from http://bit.ly/29WN08c (PR Daily)

20 Job Openings in The PR and Marketing World

PR and Marketing path

Though every workplace has its share of characters, they might not be as recognizable as those atPBS

For one thing, you’ll never find an accounting department quite as enthusiastic about numbers. Sure, some co-workers can seem cliquey, and others are downright grouchy. But even the brutish exterior of the office monster quickly crumbles. If anything, most staffers are probably too friendly(that’s HR’s problem, though). 

Meanwhile, the characters on the PBS KIDS public relations and social media team are experienced in both fields, a professional precedent its newest associate director will need to uphold. 

Supporting the network’s PBS LearningMedia initiatives, this person will work with its corporate communications team on projects ranging from managing media contacts and developing editorial calendars to assisting with PR and crisis communication efforts. 

Click here to read the full job description, and then find out even more about the characters working at PBS

Not the job for you? See what else we have in our weekly professional pickings: 


About the author:

Alan PearcyAlan doesn’t like when people refer to themselves in third-person, so he will henceforth, stop it, now. Born and raised in Springfield, Ill., I’ve had my fill of all-things Abe Lincoln. Inching upstate on the map little by little, I attended Bradley University in Peoria, where I graduated in 2008 with a B.A. in communications and advertising. I kept moving on up until I reached sweet home Chicago a couple years ago. After a stint at Leo Burnett in the Windy City, I freelanced as a writer and advertising pro of sorts, along with a few other odd-jobs, until joining forces as an editorial assistant with Ragan Communications. Things you should note: I am a Gemini, I am blonde, single, I bruise like a peach, I have webbed-toes, I will stop at nothing to wear flip-flops, and that aside from writing, I sustain sickly obsessions with popular culture, exercise, coffee, and amazingly poor choice in both film and TV. I also fall a lot.

If you have a job you would like to see highlighted on PR Daily, please email me or send me a message on Twitter @iquotesometimes

Visit PRDaily where this excerpt originally appeared.

Social media affecting teens’ concepts of friendship, intimacy

Young people feel socially supported by having large networks of on-line friends they may never see

 

Social media is affecting the way kids look at friendship and intimacy, according to researchers.

The typical teenager has 300 Facebook friends and 79 Twitter followers, the Pew Internet and American Life project found in its report, Teens, Social Media, and Privacy. And some have many more.

The 2013 study also says the norms around privacy are changing, and the majority of teens post photos and personal information about themselves for all their on-line contacts to see.

More recent survey data released last week by the Canadian non-profit digital literacy group MediaSmarts shows Canadian youth do take some steps to protect their privacy – for example, by not posting their contact information on social media.

But the paper, Online Privacy, Online Publicity, also points out that most kids have only a limited understanding of things such as privacy policies, geo-location services and the implications of sharing their passwords.

The research contributes to an emerging picture of how teens’ ideas about friendship and intimacy have been influenced by their immersion in the on-line world, says Patricia Greenfield, a UCLA developmental psychologist and the director of the Children’s Digital Media Center @ Los Angeles.

In her own research, Greenfield has found that young people feel socially supported by having large networks of on-line friends, and these are not necessarily friends they ever see face-to-face.

“We found in our study that people, college students, are not getting a sense of social support from being on the phone. They’re getting social support through bigger networks and having a sense that their audience is large.”

Teen social interaction

Patricia Greenfield, a UCLA developmental psychologist, has seen a decline in intimate friendships between young people as a result of their use of social media. Instead, many young people now derive personal support and affirmation from “likes” and feedback to their postings. (CBC)

The result is a decline in intimate friendships, Greenfield says. Instead, many young people now derive personal support and affirmation from “likes” and feedback to their postings.

“The whole idea behind intimacy is self-disclosure. Now they’re doing self-disclosure to an audience of hundreds.”

Other research at UCLA shows teens’ increasingly preferred mode of communication with their friends, texting, makes them feel less connected and bonded than face-to-face communication.

Graduate student Lauren Sherman studied various forms of communication between pairs of friends. She found the closer the experience was to in-person conversation, the more emotionally connected the friends felt. For example, video chat rated higher than a phone call, but the phone created a closer connection than texting.

“I don’t think digital communication in itself is a bad thing,” said Sherman, “but if we’re losing out on opportunities to connect with people as well as we can, that’s a problem.”

Studies have estimated teens typically send more than 3,000 texts a month.

Greenfield says that indicates kids are opting for efficiency of connection over intimacy.


By Pauline Dakin, CBC News. This article is originally appeared on CBC News

Study: Bad weather sours online reviews

If you’re not already reading online reviews with a large grain of salt, here’s even more reason to do so. 

A recent Georgia Tech/Yahoo Lab study of online restaurant reviews finds that weather is associated with the positive or negative nature of online reviews. 

From Eater

Customers who visit a restaurant on a rainy day are more likely to leave a negative review, while customers who review a restaurant on a warm sunny day are more likely to leave a positive review. 

Also, during snowy days, users rate restaurants lower than other days. 

The study’s abstract states that it has “implications for designing online recommendation sites, and in general, social media and online communities.” 

Some other findings: 

  • There are lower ratings and a higher number of reviews in July and August.
  • The highest ratings come in November.
  • Areas with a high concentration of educated people see more reviews—three times more, in fact—than places where fewer than 10 percent have diplomas.

Will the study lead to change in online review sites? Maybe. For now, if you’re doing marketing for a restaurant, consider building a weather-control machine.

 

About the author

Kevin Allen has developed social media strategies for Fortune 500 companies and created content for major brands across multiple social platforms. Previously, he served as an editor and reporter for the Chicago Sun-TimesESPNChicago.com, FoxSports.com and Ragan Communications. As a reporter, Kevin has covered MLB, NHL, NBA, PGA, NCAA football, national political campaigns, backyard barbecues and just about everything in between. He’s been a contributor to PR Daily since its launch.

New Research Shows Which Social Networks Ideal for Marketers

Which platforms are most relevant to social media marketing right now? Marketers need to know where (and how) they should focus their efforts for maximum ROI.

This article gives you four major research findings from reports tracking trends in social media marketing and the content that works best on each.

#1: People Spend More Time on Visual Networks

It’s impossible to miss the powerful effect of visual content on the social web. It can significantly enhance a brand’s marketing objectives by generating more customer interest and prompting prospects to take desired actions.

As an example of the power of pictures, consider that Tumblr, Pinterest and Instagram each gained over 10 million visitors in 2012, thanks to eye-catching content. Numbers from Statista numbers shared on Mediabistro show that users spend more time on Pinterest (1:17 minutes) or Tumblr (1:38 minutes) than on Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace and Google+ combined.

social network use stats from comscore

Visual social networks get more time from users than non-visual networks.

If you’re looking for ways to incorporate visual content into your own social media strategy, one of the key things you can do is include one or more high-quality images in all of your blog posts. (Don’t forget to add an ALT attribute in the image properties to help your SEO!)

You can also leverage real-time photo sharing. Customers and followers are used to seeing staged photos that highlight your products and the best parts of your company. Sharing impromptu pictures can be equally compelling when shared in real time.

When you do post product or brand pictures on networks like Pinterest, Instagram and Flickr, allow others to use your images in exchange for a link back to your site.

Don’t forget video! YouTube is the second-largest search engine (after Google, which coincidentally owns YouTube). Videos uploaded to YouTube do very well in searchand boost your site’s ranking. Interviews, Q&As, product demos or tips are popular with a wide audience beyond your current followers.

heygirl meme

Even if you don’t sell tangible products, your brand can still leverage visual content by using memes.

Finally, don’t give up on memes, which are especially popular on Tumblr. For the best success with memes, make sure they’re witty and match your brand and audience.

NPR did this particularly well by modifying the popular Ryan Gosling Hey Girl meme on their Tumblr page.

#2: Google+ Is Best for SEO

Google+ is finding success with social marketers more as an SEO option than a marketing tactic. While it’s doing better than Pinterest and Tumblr, only 14% of marketers are giving high priority to Google+ in 2014. 23% of those surveyed won’t consider the platform at all.

You should still have a presence on Google+, even if you’re only using it for SEO.

socialbakers social network user preference table

Google+ is widely seen as an SEO tool, rather than a compelling social network.

As you cultivate your presence on Google+, the first thing you should do is optimize your Google author profile with a great image. With an eye-catching photo, it won’t matter if you rank third or fourth on the search engine results page. Your image is what gets people’s attention and lends to your authority.

When you post an article on Google+choose your first sentence carefully and use keywords or phrases. That sentence is part of the title tag and can affect your search ranking. As a bonus, one of the great things about Google+ is that you canedit your title and posts anytime. If you find your post isn’t getting the traction you want, try a new title and lead sentence. That’s a lot of control right there!

As always, continue to publish great content on your blog and Google+. While you’re at it, go ahead and +1 your own content. Why not? Google already knows you’re the author anyway. At the very least, it encourages others to +1 your post as well!

#3: Facebook’s Updated News Feed Affects Page Posts

In January 2014, Facebook updated their news feed algorithm to deliver more relevant content to users. Status updates from pages are no longer treated the same as text updates from users’ friends, because most users interacted with friends, not pages.

What does this mean for you as a marketer? You have to mix it up. Since users may not see or engage with your page updates often, make your posts as interesting as you can. Include photos, videos, links (don’t forget to include a preview image), questions, events and offers.

bored office worker istock photo 5984364

Use interesting and fun updates to encourage your fans to engage with you. Image source: iStockPhoto.com.

In all cases, use the story type that best fits with the message you want to tell.

One more thing: If you use Facebook’s Promote feature and your post has an image, that image can’t have more than 20% text.

#4: B2B Marketers Are Most Successful on LinkedIn

Sixty-two percent of B2B marketers say LinkedIn is the most effective platform for them, with Twitter and SlideShare close behind.

comscore and marketing profs social network confidence gap statistics

LinkedIn is the most popular social network for B2B.

How can you take advantage of the most effective social media network? Take advantage of LinkedIn’s publishing platform.

LinkedIn opened up its publishing platform (previously reserved for a few editorially selected influencers like Bill Gates, Martha Stewart and Joe Pulizzi) to all 277 million LinkedIn members. This could be a game-changer.

If you decide to publish on LinkedInknow that posts with the same basic information found on 50 other blogs won’t be successful. LinkedIn users look for well-written personalized insights, professional expertise and interesting industry opinions.

Surveys are helpful to gauge trends in social media; however, it’s even more important to track your own successes and build on them. You can use both options by keeping trends in mind and using them as guides as your marketing strategy and tactics evolve.

What do you think? Are the survey results above consistent with what you’ve seen in your own social media marketing? Which platforms are working best for you? Please share your successes and experiences in the comment box below.

About the author 

Patricia Redsicker writes research reviews for Social Media Examiner. She helps business owners craft content that sells. Her blog provides healthcare industry content marketing advice. The first version of this story originally appeared on socialmediaexaminer.com

Five ways to kick-start your business’s social media presence

More than 12 million Australians use Facebook. Twitter, on the other hand, has around two million active Australian users.

Meanwhile, as many as four out of five Australian professionals use the networking site LinkedIn to advertise their skills and connect with like-minded people.

Social media presents an unprecedented opportunity for businesses to amplify their content and interact with their target market. But with limited time and resources, small business owners are often afraid of starting – or even maintaining – a social media presence. While 65% of Australians use social media, only 30% of small businesses have jumped on the bandwagon.

SmartCompany spoke to a number of experts for their advice on how businesses can make the most out of Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms.

1. Have realistic expectations 

Trevor Young, the founder of Expermedia, says it’s never too late to get your business onto social media. However, he says business owners need to have specific goals in mind.

“It’s about having the right attitude and having a positive mind,” he said. “Business owners need to have realistic expectations about what can and cannot be done. And critically, social media isn’t a sales bulletin.”

Young says social media isn’t necessarily something that yields instant results, just like any other investment. However, if you do put the time and effort into building trust and meaningful relationships between your brand and audience, that will eventually generate sales.

Dionne Kasian-Lew, a social media strategist, agrees.

“Social media is about the long-term,” she said. “There are lots of immediate returns you can get from, say, Google AdWords – but social media is about building relationships. You need to invest the time and energy.”

Young says one way to get the most out of social media is to come up with a plan, just like you would for any other aspect of your business. That way your expectations are clear and you can refine them if necessary.

“You need to ask yourself: can I use this platform to reach and further enhance the relationship I have with my audience?”

2. Don’t talk about yourself the whole time

Social media can be intimidating for business owners because it’s often perceived as something new and required specialised knowledge.

Young says that, in part, this is true because what has worked previously for traditional advertising doesn’t work for social media. Rather than talk about yourself as you would in a television commercial, social media requires businesses to be exactly that: social.

“It’s counterintuitive to the way we’ve been taught to market our brand,” he said. “It doesn’t mean you don’t do the things that still work. All it does is amplify your enthusiasm and expertise.”

Social media was originally built for individuals to interact with other people. Young says this is where SMEs have a key advantage over larger corporations. It’s much easier to come across as human on social media if you’re known for being a small team rather than a large, faceless organisation.

Kasian-Lew likens social media to a dinner party: you are more likely to want to remember engage with someone who has something interesting to say rather than just talks about themself the whole time.

Cat Matson, chief executive of HEARIS, agrees. She says it’s important business owners remember social media isn’t a one-way conversation, but a multi-way one.

“As soon as you start engaging with people they expect a conversation,” she said. “Other people will jump in.”

3. Know your audience

All of the social media experts SmartCompany spoke to stressed the importance of businesses understanding their online audience.

For Kasian-Lew, social media is premised on trust and people having meaningful interactions online. Once businesses tap into that level of trust, their audience will start talking about their products and services all on their own.

“The recommendation of your friend is going to mean a lot more to you than someone’s external view,” she said. “Those conversations mean something because they translate into meaning and behaviours.”

Young says small businesses have an advantage on social media because they are likely to specialise in a certain area and therefore know who their audience is already.

“Your expertise, knowledge and experiences – these are powerful things to share on social media,” he said. “You’ll never lose by being real and helpful and fun. Think about the people who already know and like you and let them tell your story.”

Matson says she uses social media because there isn’t enough time in the world to sit down and have a coffee and chat with every interesting person she meets. In that sense, businesses should see social media as an opportunity to connect with engaged individuals.

“The brilliance in social media is the networking opportunities,” she said. “If you choose to endorse, support or comment, they’ll do the same for you and you’ll get greater momentum than if you chose to operate in a silo.”

4. Don’t treat all social media platforms the same

Choosing which social media platform to utilise can be difficult. Kasian-Lew says there is no “cut-and-paste answer”.

“Twitter is great if you want customer care, Facebook is great for products. It depends who you are and where your audience is.”

Choosing just one or two social media platforms rather than spreading yourself too thin can be a good idea for business owners. Good content can often be repurposed, saving you both time and money.

However, it’s crucial business owners understand that different platforms have different strengths and weaknesses. For example, copying and pasting a tweet into a Facebook status is not playing to Facebook’s strengths. Unlike Twitter, Facebook does not have a character limit and images are more important.

Matson says the most successful businesses understand that when it comes to social media, a one-size-fits-all approach isn’t the way to go. She says your business is going to look lazy if you’ve posted the exact same message on more than one platform.

“Each platform has a different nuance or vernacular if you like. What you do on Pinterest is extraordinarily different to what you do on Facebook.”

5. Give your team members autonomy

Matson says she often sees businesses becoming “stuck” while they wait for the perfect social media strategy. While it is important to come up with a detailed, original plan – you have to “just get in there and see what happens” at some point. One way to do this is for business owners to give staff members the responsibility of managing social media.

“I’m puzzled by the reluctance to allow staff to speak on behalf of the company,” she said. “Your staff have been hired and you must trust them on some level to engage with your customers.”

Giving staff members access to social media accounts is a good way to ensure the business is not neglecting its online audience. And if there are any mistakes or slip-ups, the key is to apologise and carry on because everyone makes mistakes from time-to-time.

“In the age of social media people accept we are human. When we engage with a social channel we are engaging with real people in a fast moving environment.”


Written by Broede Carmody. Broede is a SmartCompany reporter who has a passion for covering work health and safety. He studies journalism at RMIT. Follow him on Twitter: @BroedeCarmody. Visit Smartcompany where the first version of this excerpt is originally appeared.

Photos Are Still King on Facebook

 

Most of the content brands post to Facebook includes photos – 75% of all content in a one-month period, to be exact. We examined a large collection of Facebook posts made by over 30,000 brands in order to find which type of post scored the best engagement. There were clear differences between top performers and the rest of the pack.

A little while back, we previewed our upcoming conference, Engage London 2014, by sharing some data on different post types and the absolute interactions they receive. Let’s dive into it a bit deeper now.

Post Types

Again, three-fourths of all posts by the brands we monitored included photos.

Average Interactions for all Posts

By examining the average number of interactions that the different post types received, photos’ dominance becomes even clearer. Firstly, it is essential to segment the monitored pages according to page size. Much larger pages have a wider reach (and often, higher budgets), so it logically follows that each post type would increase its average number of interactions as the size of the pages increase. Photos garner the highest average number of interactions per post for all three page sizes, but it is not until the largest group of pages (1,000,000+) that the difference becomes extreme.

The Top Tier

Looking at interactions among the top 10% of all monitored content, we can see that videos and albums have the same percent share (4% for both) of total interactions as they do overall share of published content. Links and statuses lose some of that overall share of engagement when we look solely at the top 10%.

Conversely, photos increase their share.

Despite all this, our data does not necessarily imply that a photo post will automatically be among the most engaging on Facebook. It simply reveals a common trait that the best posts feature more frequently than do ordinary posts. In order to take advantage of insights like these, you need to know more than just one metric – you need to know all of them.

Written by Phillip Ross, Social Media Analyst. Socialbakers is where the version of this excerpt originally appeared.